Phenotypic plasticity with respect to salt stress response by Lotus glaber: The role of its AM fungal and rhizobial symbionts

Our hypothesis is that Lotus glaber (a glycophytic species, highly tolerant to saline-alkaline soils) displays a plastic root phenotypic response to soil salinity that may be influenced by mycorrhizal and rhizobial microorganisms. Uninoculated plants and plants colonised by Glomus intraradices or Me...

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Autores principales: Echeverria, M., Scambato, A.A., Sannazzaro, A.I., Maiale, S., Ruiz, O.A., Menéndez, A.B.
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Acceso en línea:http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12110/paper_09406360_v18_n6-7_p317_Echeverria
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spelling todo:paper_09406360_v18_n6-7_p317_Echeverria2023-10-03T15:48:56Z Phenotypic plasticity with respect to salt stress response by Lotus glaber: The role of its AM fungal and rhizobial symbionts Echeverria, M. Scambato, A.A. Sannazzaro, A.I. Maiale, S. Ruiz, O.A. Menéndez, A.B. Glomus intraradices Lotus glaber Mesorhizobium loti Phenotypic plasticity Salt stress sodium chloride environmental stress fungus legume phenotypic plasticity rhizobacterium salinity article drug effect fungus growth, development and aging heat shock response Lotus microbiology mycorrhiza phenotype physiology plant root Rhizobium species difference symbiosis Fungi Heat-Shock Response Lotus Mycorrhizae Phenotype Plant Roots Rhizobium Sodium Chloride Species Specificity Symbiosis Glomus intraradices Lotus glaber Mesorhizobium Mesorhizobium loti Mimosa Our hypothesis is that Lotus glaber (a glycophytic species, highly tolerant to saline-alkaline soils) displays a plastic root phenotypic response to soil salinity that may be influenced by mycorrhizal and rhizobial microorganisms. Uninoculated plants and plants colonised by Glomus intraradices or Mesorhizobium loti were exposed to either 150 or 0 mM NaCl. General plant growth and root architectural parameters (morphology and topology) were measured and phenotypic plasticity determined at the end of the salt treatment period. Two genotypes differing in their salt tolerance capacity were used in this study. G. intraradices and M. loti reduced the total biomass of non-salinised, sensitive plants, but they did not affect that of corresponding tolerant ones. Root morphology of sensitive plants was greatly affected by salinity, whereas mycorrhiza establishment counteracted salinity effects. Under both saline conditions, the external link length and the internal link length of mycorrhizal salt-sensitive plants were higher than those of uninoculated control and rhizobial treatments. The topological trend (TT) was strongly influenced by genotype x symbiosis interaction. Under non-saline conditions, nodulated root systems of the sensitive plant genotype had a more herringbone architecture than corresponding uninoculated ones. At 150 mM NaCl, nodulated root systems of tolerant plants were more dichotomous and those of the corresponding sensitive genotype more herringbone in architecture. Notwithstanding the absence of a link between TTs and variations in plant growth, it is possible to predict a dissimilar adaptation of plants with different TTs. Root colonisation by either symbiotic microorganisms reduced the level of root phenotypic plasticity in the sensitive plant genotype. We conclude that root plasticity could be part of the general mechanism of L. glaber salt tolerance only in the case of non-symbiotic plants. © 2008 Springer-Verlag. Fil:Echeverria, M. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; Argentina. Fil:Scambato, A.A. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; Argentina. Fil:Menéndez, A.B. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; Argentina. JOUR info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/ar http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12110/paper_09406360_v18_n6-7_p317_Echeverria
institution Universidad de Buenos Aires
institution_str I-28
repository_str R-134
collection Biblioteca Digital - Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (UBA)
topic Glomus intraradices
Lotus glaber
Mesorhizobium loti
Phenotypic plasticity
Salt stress
sodium chloride
environmental stress
fungus
legume
phenotypic plasticity
rhizobacterium
salinity
article
drug effect
fungus
growth, development and aging
heat shock response
Lotus
microbiology
mycorrhiza
phenotype
physiology
plant root
Rhizobium
species difference
symbiosis
Fungi
Heat-Shock Response
Lotus
Mycorrhizae
Phenotype
Plant Roots
Rhizobium
Sodium Chloride
Species Specificity
Symbiosis
Glomus intraradices
Lotus glaber
Mesorhizobium
Mesorhizobium loti
Mimosa
spellingShingle Glomus intraradices
Lotus glaber
Mesorhizobium loti
Phenotypic plasticity
Salt stress
sodium chloride
environmental stress
fungus
legume
phenotypic plasticity
rhizobacterium
salinity
article
drug effect
fungus
growth, development and aging
heat shock response
Lotus
microbiology
mycorrhiza
phenotype
physiology
plant root
Rhizobium
species difference
symbiosis
Fungi
Heat-Shock Response
Lotus
Mycorrhizae
Phenotype
Plant Roots
Rhizobium
Sodium Chloride
Species Specificity
Symbiosis
Glomus intraradices
Lotus glaber
Mesorhizobium
Mesorhizobium loti
Mimosa
Echeverria, M.
Scambato, A.A.
Sannazzaro, A.I.
Maiale, S.
Ruiz, O.A.
Menéndez, A.B.
Phenotypic plasticity with respect to salt stress response by Lotus glaber: The role of its AM fungal and rhizobial symbionts
topic_facet Glomus intraradices
Lotus glaber
Mesorhizobium loti
Phenotypic plasticity
Salt stress
sodium chloride
environmental stress
fungus
legume
phenotypic plasticity
rhizobacterium
salinity
article
drug effect
fungus
growth, development and aging
heat shock response
Lotus
microbiology
mycorrhiza
phenotype
physiology
plant root
Rhizobium
species difference
symbiosis
Fungi
Heat-Shock Response
Lotus
Mycorrhizae
Phenotype
Plant Roots
Rhizobium
Sodium Chloride
Species Specificity
Symbiosis
Glomus intraradices
Lotus glaber
Mesorhizobium
Mesorhizobium loti
Mimosa
description Our hypothesis is that Lotus glaber (a glycophytic species, highly tolerant to saline-alkaline soils) displays a plastic root phenotypic response to soil salinity that may be influenced by mycorrhizal and rhizobial microorganisms. Uninoculated plants and plants colonised by Glomus intraradices or Mesorhizobium loti were exposed to either 150 or 0 mM NaCl. General plant growth and root architectural parameters (morphology and topology) were measured and phenotypic plasticity determined at the end of the salt treatment period. Two genotypes differing in their salt tolerance capacity were used in this study. G. intraradices and M. loti reduced the total biomass of non-salinised, sensitive plants, but they did not affect that of corresponding tolerant ones. Root morphology of sensitive plants was greatly affected by salinity, whereas mycorrhiza establishment counteracted salinity effects. Under both saline conditions, the external link length and the internal link length of mycorrhizal salt-sensitive plants were higher than those of uninoculated control and rhizobial treatments. The topological trend (TT) was strongly influenced by genotype x symbiosis interaction. Under non-saline conditions, nodulated root systems of the sensitive plant genotype had a more herringbone architecture than corresponding uninoculated ones. At 150 mM NaCl, nodulated root systems of tolerant plants were more dichotomous and those of the corresponding sensitive genotype more herringbone in architecture. Notwithstanding the absence of a link between TTs and variations in plant growth, it is possible to predict a dissimilar adaptation of plants with different TTs. Root colonisation by either symbiotic microorganisms reduced the level of root phenotypic plasticity in the sensitive plant genotype. We conclude that root plasticity could be part of the general mechanism of L. glaber salt tolerance only in the case of non-symbiotic plants. © 2008 Springer-Verlag.
format JOUR
author Echeverria, M.
Scambato, A.A.
Sannazzaro, A.I.
Maiale, S.
Ruiz, O.A.
Menéndez, A.B.
author_facet Echeverria, M.
Scambato, A.A.
Sannazzaro, A.I.
Maiale, S.
Ruiz, O.A.
Menéndez, A.B.
author_sort Echeverria, M.
title Phenotypic plasticity with respect to salt stress response by Lotus glaber: The role of its AM fungal and rhizobial symbionts
title_short Phenotypic plasticity with respect to salt stress response by Lotus glaber: The role of its AM fungal and rhizobial symbionts
title_full Phenotypic plasticity with respect to salt stress response by Lotus glaber: The role of its AM fungal and rhizobial symbionts
title_fullStr Phenotypic plasticity with respect to salt stress response by Lotus glaber: The role of its AM fungal and rhizobial symbionts
title_full_unstemmed Phenotypic plasticity with respect to salt stress response by Lotus glaber: The role of its AM fungal and rhizobial symbionts
title_sort phenotypic plasticity with respect to salt stress response by lotus glaber: the role of its am fungal and rhizobial symbionts
url http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12110/paper_09406360_v18_n6-7_p317_Echeverria
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