Effects of temperature on responses to anoxia and oxygen reperfusion in Drosophila melanogaster

Insects in general, and Drosophila in particular, are much more capable of surviving anoxia than vertebrates, and the mechanisms involved are of considerable biomedical and ecological interest. Temperature is likely to strongly affect both the rates of damage occurring in anoxia and the recovery pro...

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Autor principal: Schilman, Pablo Ernesto
Publicado: 2011
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Acceso en línea:https://bibliotecadigital.exactas.uba.ar/collection/paper/document/paper_00220949_v214_n8_p1271_Schilman
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12110/paper_00220949_v214_n8_p1271_Schilman
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spelling paper:paper_00220949_v214_n8_p1271_Schilman2023-06-08T14:45:36Z Effects of temperature on responses to anoxia and oxygen reperfusion in Drosophila melanogaster Schilman, Pablo Ernesto Insect Ischemia O2 production Reperfusion damage Temperature oxygen animal anoxia article Drosophila melanogaster instrumentation male metabolism methodology photochemistry physiology spirometry survival rate temperature Animals Anoxia Drosophila melanogaster Male Oxygen Photochemistry Spirometry Survival Rate Temperature Animalia Drosophila melanogaster Hexapoda Vertebrata Insects in general, and Drosophila in particular, are much more capable of surviving anoxia than vertebrates, and the mechanisms involved are of considerable biomedical and ecological interest. Temperature is likely to strongly affect both the rates of damage occurring in anoxia and the recovery processes in normoxia, but as yet there is no information on the effect of this crucial variable on recovery rates from anoxia in any animal. We studied the effects of temperature, and thus indirectly of metabolic flux rates, on survival and recovery times of individual male Drosophila melanogaster following anoxia and O2 reperfusion. Individual flies were reared at 25° and exposed to an anoxic period of 7.5, 25, 42.5 or 60?min at 20, 25 or 30°. Before, during and after anoxic exposure the flies' metabolic rates (MRs), rates of water loss and activity indices were recorded. Temperature strongly affected the MR of the flies, with a Q10 of 2.21. Temperature did not affect the slope of the relationship between time to recovery and duration of anoxic exposure, suggesting that thermal effects on damage and repair rates were similar. However, the intercept of that relationship was significantly lower (i.e. recovery was most rapid) at 25°, which was the rearing temperature. When temperatures during exposure to anoxia and during recovery were switched, recovery times matched those predicted from a model in which the accumulation and clearance of metabolic end-products share a similar dependence on temperature. ©2011. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd. Fil:Schilman, P.E. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; Argentina. 2011 https://bibliotecadigital.exactas.uba.ar/collection/paper/document/paper_00220949_v214_n8_p1271_Schilman http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12110/paper_00220949_v214_n8_p1271_Schilman
institution Universidad de Buenos Aires
institution_str I-28
repository_str R-134
collection Biblioteca Digital - Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (UBA)
topic Insect
Ischemia
O2 production
Reperfusion damage
Temperature
oxygen
animal
anoxia
article
Drosophila melanogaster
instrumentation
male
metabolism
methodology
photochemistry
physiology
spirometry
survival rate
temperature
Animals
Anoxia
Drosophila melanogaster
Male
Oxygen
Photochemistry
Spirometry
Survival Rate
Temperature
Animalia
Drosophila melanogaster
Hexapoda
Vertebrata
spellingShingle Insect
Ischemia
O2 production
Reperfusion damage
Temperature
oxygen
animal
anoxia
article
Drosophila melanogaster
instrumentation
male
metabolism
methodology
photochemistry
physiology
spirometry
survival rate
temperature
Animals
Anoxia
Drosophila melanogaster
Male
Oxygen
Photochemistry
Spirometry
Survival Rate
Temperature
Animalia
Drosophila melanogaster
Hexapoda
Vertebrata
Schilman, Pablo Ernesto
Effects of temperature on responses to anoxia and oxygen reperfusion in Drosophila melanogaster
topic_facet Insect
Ischemia
O2 production
Reperfusion damage
Temperature
oxygen
animal
anoxia
article
Drosophila melanogaster
instrumentation
male
metabolism
methodology
photochemistry
physiology
spirometry
survival rate
temperature
Animals
Anoxia
Drosophila melanogaster
Male
Oxygen
Photochemistry
Spirometry
Survival Rate
Temperature
Animalia
Drosophila melanogaster
Hexapoda
Vertebrata
description Insects in general, and Drosophila in particular, are much more capable of surviving anoxia than vertebrates, and the mechanisms involved are of considerable biomedical and ecological interest. Temperature is likely to strongly affect both the rates of damage occurring in anoxia and the recovery processes in normoxia, but as yet there is no information on the effect of this crucial variable on recovery rates from anoxia in any animal. We studied the effects of temperature, and thus indirectly of metabolic flux rates, on survival and recovery times of individual male Drosophila melanogaster following anoxia and O2 reperfusion. Individual flies were reared at 25° and exposed to an anoxic period of 7.5, 25, 42.5 or 60?min at 20, 25 or 30°. Before, during and after anoxic exposure the flies' metabolic rates (MRs), rates of water loss and activity indices were recorded. Temperature strongly affected the MR of the flies, with a Q10 of 2.21. Temperature did not affect the slope of the relationship between time to recovery and duration of anoxic exposure, suggesting that thermal effects on damage and repair rates were similar. However, the intercept of that relationship was significantly lower (i.e. recovery was most rapid) at 25°, which was the rearing temperature. When temperatures during exposure to anoxia and during recovery were switched, recovery times matched those predicted from a model in which the accumulation and clearance of metabolic end-products share a similar dependence on temperature. ©2011. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.
author Schilman, Pablo Ernesto
author_facet Schilman, Pablo Ernesto
author_sort Schilman, Pablo Ernesto
title Effects of temperature on responses to anoxia and oxygen reperfusion in Drosophila melanogaster
title_short Effects of temperature on responses to anoxia and oxygen reperfusion in Drosophila melanogaster
title_full Effects of temperature on responses to anoxia and oxygen reperfusion in Drosophila melanogaster
title_fullStr Effects of temperature on responses to anoxia and oxygen reperfusion in Drosophila melanogaster
title_full_unstemmed Effects of temperature on responses to anoxia and oxygen reperfusion in Drosophila melanogaster
title_sort effects of temperature on responses to anoxia and oxygen reperfusion in drosophila melanogaster
publishDate 2011
url https://bibliotecadigital.exactas.uba.ar/collection/paper/document/paper_00220949_v214_n8_p1271_Schilman
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12110/paper_00220949_v214_n8_p1271_Schilman
work_keys_str_mv AT schilmanpabloernesto effectsoftemperatureonresponsestoanoxiaandoxygenreperfusionindrosophilamelanogaster
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